Timeline of the Seventies (XIX century)

Timeline of the Seventies
Timeline of the Seventies by Kai NRG/Geneva

Timeline description is given by Kai NRG/Geneva on his Flickr post here.

October 12th
Confederate General Robert E. Lee died at Lexington, Virginia. He was sixty-three.
“Forth from its scabbard! All in vain!
Forth flashed the sword of Lee!
‘Tis shrouded now in its sheath again,
It sleeps the sleep of our noble slain,
Defeated, yet without a stain,
Proudly and peacefully.”

The unification of Italy as a nation, no longer city states and without the major civil control of the Pope, occurred during this year. Much of this was due to the efforts of the patriot Garibaldi.

The Paris Commune was smashed by the French Army during “The Bloody Week.” This commune had been formed as a reaction to the potential reestablishment of the monarchy. During its suppression, over 20,000 Parisians were killed. On a side note, Paris has really had quite a slew of mob riots throughout its history!
October 8th
The beginning of the Great Chicago Fire. Rumor said it was started by a cow, but rumor is, well, rumor. Three hundred people lost their lives in this fire, and damages ran up to an estimated two hundred million dollars.
November 10th
Journalist Henry Morton Stanley uttered the famous words, “Dr. Livingstone, I presume,” when he met that renown explorer in the depths of Africa. Livingstone had disappeared and was thought dead.

This year witnessed the development of Blue Jeans.

The Japanese invaded Taiwan this year. Their pathetic excuse wasthe murder of a shipwrecked seaman by the inhabitants. The Japanese withdrew their troops after the Chinese agreed to the stipulated payment.

Another huge highlight of this year was the creation of the USA Republican party elephant!

The first Kentucky Derby was held this year. It was won by – yep, you guessed it – a horse! This particular horse’s name happened to be Aristides.

March 10th
Alexander Graham Bell spilled acid on his pants. This, in itself, is not a very noteworthy incident, especially as it doubtless occurred quite regularly. However, it set off a massive chain reaction! Alexander called to his assistant, Watson. But Watson heard him through the trial telephone speaker!

The National League of Baseball was also founded this year.

June 25th
Along with all his 256 men, General George Armstrong Custer was killed in this last Indian victory. Custer’s famous last stand… not thelemonade one though.

August 2nd
Wild Bill Hickok was shot in the back of the head while holding aces and eights, the Dead Man’s Hand.

And to top the decade off, this was the year Thomas Alva Edison invented a commercially realistic lightbulb and switched on the electrical revolution!

Vercingetorix Throws Down His Arms at the Feet of Julius Caesar

The Siege of Alesia
The Siege of Alesia by Mark of Falwort
Based off of the painting “Vercingetorix Throws Down His Arms at the Feet of Julius Caesar” 1899, by Lionel Noel Royer

Pictorial Map of Europe

Great work by Matt Base representing Europe’s countries with some of the most iconic monuments. The micro scale work is amazing. Thumbs up also for the map itself!
Pictorial Map of Europe
Pictorial Map of Europe by Matt Bace

Trade and Empire

Trade and Empire
Trade and Empire by Macsen Wledig


Trade and Empire

“By the time the Emperor Hadrian entered the purple, Rome controlled a vast area stretching from northern Europe to the Middle East. Sea trade and transport were vital to the functioning of the Empire and so numerous ports sprung up along the coast of Britannia. On the Tyne side of Hadrian’s Wall the fort of Arbeia (now known as South Shields) grew into one such port and was the destination of many supply shipments to the wall.

Trading ships, such as the one depicted in this scene, were common visitors to Arbeia and came from all corners of the empire. A funeral monument found at the site tells us much about what this trade meant to the area. It is dedicated to a lady called Regina and is unique in Britain for its bilingual inscription, written in Latin and Palmyrene. The inscription reveals that Regina was of the Catuvellaunian tribe while her husband Barates, was a Palmyrene merchant living at Arbeia, which had attached to it a substantial civilian settlement. From Barates’ own funeral monument we know that he supplied military standards to the cohorts along the wall.

Despite being on the edge of the Empire, the civilian settlement at Arbeia must have been home to a diverse polyglot population. Thanks to the trade bought by the Empire’s many ships, people, ideas and symbols must have circulated frequently, making it lively and interesting place to live.”

Historical context given by Macsen Wledig and available here.

Hadrian’s wall was a defensive fortification in Roman Britain to defend agains Scottish barbarians. Begun in AD 122, during the rule of emperor Hadrian, it was the first of two fortifications built across Great Britain.

LukeClarenceVan is the author of this marvelous construction where he shows a minor skirmish where a force of Scotsmen besiege the a gate with their most powerful war machine – the caber toss.

Hadrian's Wall